January 18, 2018

How to Hit A golf Ball Straight With A Driver: The Secret Behind Jim Furyk’s Straight Shooting Golf

how to hit a golf ball straight with a driverIf you want to know how to hit a golf ball straight with a driver you need to understand the secret behind Jim Furyk’s golf swing.

If you learn to grip your club in the same manner as Jim Furyk you will soon experience how to hit a golf ball straight with a driver.

Ironically, I doubt that Jim Furyk even knows the secret behind his straight shooting swing.

Irrespective, I do know the secret behind his unique golf method.

After many years of research and thousands of experiments I discovered many years ago that the instant you grip a club in a conventional manner, with either an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip, your club face will rotate to an open alignment and to an out-to-in path or essentially, to a slice alignment.

Professional players and low amateur players have learned through trial and error how to manipulate the club in some way after gripping it in a conventional manner to deliver a square club face to the ball at impact on a path that matches their shoulder line to hit a straight golf shot.

This instinctive manipulation sometimes occurs before the golf swing, sometimes during the golf swing or during a combination of both. sometimes they are successful and sometimes not.

However, there are some alternative ways to grip a golf club that lock-in a square alignment and an on-line swing path the instant such a grip is assumed.

I have discovered more than eight ways to grip a club in such a manner that locks-in a square alignment and an on line swing path. I address these in the book, How To Lock-In A Perfect Golf Grip, which is available at http://lockedingolf.com.

In addition to the eight I instruct how to perform, Jim Furyk’s “double overlapping” grip also locks-in a square alignment and an on-line swing path of his club face.

It is the secret behind his ability to hit straight golf shots.

Instead of just overlapping the little finger of his right hand atop the groove between the index and middle fingers of his left hand to form a grip on his club, he overlaps the little finger of his right hand atop the groove between the ring and middle fingers of his left hand and, overlaps the ring finger of his right hand atop the groove between the index and middle fingers of his left hand.

He then docks the lifeline of his right hand squarely and securely on his left thumb to complete his grip.

If he then assumes a comfortable stance and posture to his ball, centers the sweet spot of his club face as near as possible to the back of his ball, aligns his shoulders parallel with his target line, keeps his left heel planted, maintains eye contact with the ball and executes a non-manipulative golf swing, his ball will fly straight, discounting wind conditions and elevation differences between his stance and ball.

The loop in his swing occurs because he stands so near the ball in his address position.

This is not necessary however.

Even if he stood farther from the ball with this type of grip he would nonetheless hit the ball straight as long as he performed the pre-swing steps  described above and executed a non-manipulative golf swing.

However, it is sometimes necessary to curve golf shots instead of hitting them straight, due to wind conditions, etc.

The “double overlapping” grip is not conducive to shaping golf shots which handicaps Jim Furyk when facing such conditions.

Nonetheless, there is a simple adjustment to the “double overlapping” grip that can lock-in either a draw or a fade alignment, neither of which Furyk is aware, apparently.

In the book, How To Lock-In A Perfect Golf Grip, and other Locked-In Golf™ books I have written I share some of the mechanisms to adjust a locked-in straight alignment to a locked-in fade or draw alignment.

Once you learn how to perform them you will know more than just how to hit a golf ball straight with a driver

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Copyright © 2012 by Gordon Jackson –all rights reserved.  golf techniques